Popular Searches

6 total posts. Showing results 1 - 6.

Robin Forbes-Lorman

Robin Forbes-Lorman

  • Postdoctoral Scholar, biology education research
  • Ph.D. in behavioral neuroendocrinology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • B.A. in Biology, Earlham College

I teach biology, primarily Anatomy and Physiology. I carry out behavioral neuroendocrinology research (hormones on the brain and behavior) in rats. I am particularly interested in the role of steroid hormones in social and sexual behaviors, as well as the neuropeptides vasopressin and oxytocin in social behaviors. I also carry out pedagogy research on how students learn. I grew up in Madison, WI and got my B.A. from Earlham College, a school about the same size as Ripon. I got my MS and PhD from UW-Madison in behavioral neuroendocrinology, did a postdoc in biology education research, then taught for two years at Evergreen College in Olympia, Washington. I currently live in Ripon with my husband, two kids, two dogs, cat, and chickens. I am a runner and hope to get back into triathlons soon (I am a 2x Ironman).

headshot of Julia Manor

Julia Meyers-Manor

  • Ph.D., University of Minnesota
  • B.A., Macalester College

I teach courses in neuroscience, animal cognition, and learning. I run the Animal Cognition Lab, where students are able to work with rats and dogs to further understand both human and animal behavior. I also often bring in my own dogs to classes, giving the opportunity for students to work with the canines as well.

Patrick Willoughby

Patrick Willoughby

  • Ph.D., University of Minnesota
  • B.S., University of Northern Iowa

Molecules determine how we interact with the universe, and I have spent my career devoted to the study of their preparation and properties. In the classroom, I teach Organic Chemistry where my students and I begin by exploring things as fundamental as protons, neutrons, and electrons, laying the foundation for advanced studies into transition metal-catalyzed transformations, polymeric materials science, and the cellular production of biomolecules. Outside of the classroom, I mentor students in research projects where we develop new approaches for the synthesis of molecular building blocks useful in the preparation of new medicines. These are highly rewarding pursuits, requiring that my students and I apply our mastery of fundamental organic chemistry to enhance processes for making modern pharmaceutical therapeutics.

Barbara Sisson

Barbara Sisson

  • Postdoctoral Associate, Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute (formerly Children’s Memorial Research Center), Chicago, Illinois
  • Ph.D., Northwestern University
  • B.A., Lake Forest College

I am a developmental biologist interested in how cartilage cells get their shape. My lab studies this using zebrafish as a model system for human facial birth defects. I teach Introductory Biology, Scientific Writing and Communication, Cell Biology, Developmental Biology, and Cancer Biology.

Mark Kainz

Mark Kainz

  • Postdoctoral scientist (plant virology), University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Postdoctoral fellow (bacteriology), University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Ph.D., Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (biochemistry, molecular and cell biology)
  • M.S., Washington State University, Pullman, Washington (plant pathology)
  • B.S., University of Portland, Portland, Oregon (biology)

I have been a faculty member at Ripon since 2008 and I love my job. I am interested in molecular biology and virology. My research students and I study the mechanics of how RNA is synthesized in bacteria and the factors that control how new virus particles are assembled in a virus infected cell. I teach Genetics and Microbiology every year and Molecular Biology and Virology every few years. I am also a member of the staff that teach our Introductory Biology and our Scientific Writing & Communication classes. I am a mentor for the Applied Innovation Seminar that is the capstone of our Catalyst curriculum. I teach another Catalyst class called “Bring out your dead: Infectious disease through history” that Professor Matzke from our history department and I developed together. I am part of the team that oversees the Catalyst curriculum, Ripon’s skill-based general education curriculum.

Colleen Byron

Colleen Byron

  • Ph.D., analytical chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • B.A., chemistry, College of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, Minnesota