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10 total posts. Showing results 1 - 10.

Isaac Sung Portrait

Changsok Isaac Sung

  • Ph.D (expected), University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • M.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • B.S., University of Oklahoma-Norman

Hello! My name is Isaac Sung and I teach computer and data science at Ripon College. I teach all of the required computer science courses and some electives, such as Introduction to Programming, Object-Oriented Programming, Data Structures & Algorithms, and Artificial Intelligence & Applied Machine Learning. One of my favorite electives to teach is Introduction to Video Game Development. My research interests include video game design, human-computer interaction, and computer science education.

Christina Othon Portrait

Christina Othon

  • Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • M.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • B.S., University of Iowa

Born and raised in Illinois, I was the first person in my family to graduate from college. I have a passion for science which I love to share with students. My background is in Soft Condensed Matter Physics and Biophysics. My research now focuses on how liquid dynamics can modify and regulate biological processes. I have had a very diverse career that allowed me to work closely with researchers in other disciplines such as biology, chemistry, and medicine. This experience has informed my teaching and mentoring of undergraduate research students. I aim to demonstrate to students in other majors, how physics can inform topics in their own disciplines.

Brett Barwick

Brett Barwick

  • Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • M.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • B.S., Doane College

I received my undergraduate degree in Physics in 2002 at Doane College in Crete, NE, which is a school very similar to Ripon. After graduating I continued studying physics and received my Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2007. After completing my Ph.D. I joined the group of Nobel prize winner Prof. Ahmed Zewail at Caltech as a postdoctoral researcher where I worked on developing ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) techniques. Over the last 10 years or so that I have been a professor, I have taught most courses that are offered at the undergraduate level, with one of my favorites being Quantum Mechanics. Outside the classroom I strive to create opportunities for students and have worked with ~30 paid undergraduate summer researchers on a variety of projects. My research primarily focuses on studying the fundamental quantum properties of electrons/light interactions.

Andrea Young

Andrea N. Young

  • Ph.D. in Mathematics, The University of Texas at Austin
  • B.S. in Mathematics, Pennsylvania State University
Patrick Willoughby

Patrick Willoughby

  • Ph.D., University of Minnesota
  • B.S., University of Northern Iowa

Molecules determine how we interact with the universe, and I have spent my career devoted to the study of their preparation and properties. In the classroom, I teach Organic Chemistry where my students and I begin by exploring things as fundamental as protons, neutrons, and electrons, laying the foundation for advanced studies into transition metal-catalyzed transformations, polymeric materials science, and the cellular production of biomolecules. Outside of the classroom, I mentor students in research projects where we develop new approaches for the synthesis of molecular building blocks useful in the preparation of new medicines. These are highly rewarding pursuits, requiring that my students and I apply our mastery of fundamental organic chemistry to enhance processes for making modern pharmaceutical therapeutics.

David Scott Portrait

David W. Scott

  • M.A. in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • B.A. in Mathematics, Pomona College

The son of a Ripon College chemistry professor and associated with the college since 1962, I’ve worked with students since 1980. I served as men’s soccer coach from 1980-1995, left that when I was Director of Coaching Education for the Wisconsin Soccer Association to be assistant coach for 25 years at Marian University, and have now returned as assistant coach here. However, I began teaching part-time in the math department in 1982 and have taught full-time since 1984. In addition, for more than 20 years I have taught a fencing course for the college. I have also played trombone many semesters in the college jazz ensemble or the college orchestra.

For much of my time here our department had a philosophy that we should all be able to teach essentially any of the courses we offer in mathematics, and I have taught all of them multiple times with only a couple of exceptions. I have also taught a large number of courses in computer science over the years, developing our first courses in artificial intelligence and algorithms, as well as teaching programming in a variety of languages. I particularly like teaching courses in discrete math, algebraic structures, and geometry and topology (my area of study in graduate school), but I always teach the course in secondary teaching methods. I have great interest in education, and have served for 20 years on the Ripon school board. I am especially interested in students who want to be teachers at any level.

Joseph Scanlon

Joseph Scanlon

  • Ph.D., University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
  • B.A. cum laude, Wabash College
McKenzie Lamb

McKenzie Lamb

  • Ph. D. Mathematics, University of Arizona
  • B.A. Mathematics, Beloit College

I’m a mathematician by training. My dissertation and first published paper focused on Poisson Lie theory, which combines elements of algebra and differential geometry. In recent year, however, I have pivoted toward more applied topics–board game analysis, gerrymandering, applications of machine learning, for example. As a consequence, the tools I use have shifted from abstract arguments to computer simulations. I am especially interested in how Monte Carlo simulations, optimization algorithms, and machine learning techniques can be applied to real-world situations. I am also interested in how graphical representations of data can be used to support quantitative reasoning.

In my spare time, I enjoy challenging myself by trying new activities for which I have no natural ability. Recently, I have taken up long distance longboarding, and the fact that I am not good at it only increases my motivation. I also enjoy skate skiing, rock climbing, and mountain biking.

Dean Katahira

Dean Katahira

  • Ph.D., Inorganic chemistry, Yale University
  • B.A., Chemistry, Lake Forest College
Colleen Byron

Colleen Byron

  • Ph.D., analytical chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • B.A., chemistry, College of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, Minnesota