Ripon College artists showing work in Fond du Lac

Two exhibits running at the Thelma Sadoff Center for the Arts in Fond du Lac have ties to Ripon College.

“Rafael Francisco Salas: Salvage and Sky” features of the work of Salas, associate professor of art. He combines landscape, the legacy of Byzantine iconography, portraiture, architecture and country music into artwork that evokes a strange, rural poetry. It reflects a personal journey of mixed race identity, conflict, beauty, and devotion played out on the vast landscapes of rural Wisconsin.

“Prehistory: Emerging Art from Ripon College” features submitted work by Ripon College students and alumni. The exhibit was curated by Salas. The work displays the diversity of thought that these artists have engaged with in their study at Ripon College and beyond. It is a celebration of the liberal arts tradition, reflects on responses to global events as well as personal invocations of art and the creative process.

Both exhibits are running through March 18. Visit the center’s web site for more information.


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